Managing Leadership styles Essay

Managing Leadership styles
To attempt to define leadership is futile because to try to do is to create concepts and limitations, which true leaders can never be subject to[1]. If there is one thing certain about leadership, it is that its function that takes place independent of power or position[2]. A person becomes leaders when he or she commands the respect and loyalty of a group of people, and directs their actions towards a same goal[3]. Such a process takes place naturally, in the absence of any form of coercion. By contrast, headships are positions of authority that happen secondary to an appointive position[4]. Managers and executives may have landed their roles by virtue of the education, skills, and experience. They are in change of certain areas of responsibility, but they do not necessarily become leaders when they are assigned such headship positions[5]. They are assigned to manage a certain group of people, and these people in return follow these managers because it is their duty to do. They have no other choice because their work imposes such duties. When a person becomes a leader, the transformation is solely determined by the person involved.

In the process of becoming leaders, managers and executives can assume a variety of leadership styles, depending on the situation. In effect, the ability to juggle several leader leadership styles and the ability to use them appropriately is the key to becoming a true and effective leader.

One of the most notable concepts about leadership, particularly in that has emerged in recent times was the one forwarded by Sergiovanni. Rather than be autocratic isolationists, leaders must have the ability for self-determination and meaningful involvement in their community[6]. Leaders can only be called as such when their vision and action has proper grounding on reality[7]. Only then can leaders bring about meaningful reforms in society. Because they consider themselves as agents of positive change, the leader and manager educated person will be more thoughtful of his actions and decisions, fully aware that these actions and decision have far reaching and profound impact on other lives as well[8].

Leaders crate or initiate change in the hopes of enhancing the experience, not only for staff and subordinates, but for the larger community that the organization is a part of. Successful leadership initiates change. However, positive change is not the simple imposition of new rules from the top down[9]. For change to have any meaning, the reforms should be based on the consideration of the needs of everyone involved[10]. By improving communication and relationships with all members of the institution, leaders are able to bring about the kind of change that creates better conditions for learning and cooperation, and responds to the needs and concerns of those affected by the change[11]. True leadership, especially in businesses, involves the ability to create conditions that enhance the development and learning of both the individual and the organization. The ideal leader creates is a culture of collaboration and shared vision, where everyone’s participation determines the collective success of the individual[12]. Rather than change for change’s sake, leaders should pay more attention on establishing relationships and redefining values, which will then be the basis of change[13]. Through experience and constant reflection of practice, leaders gain an almost instinctive sense for solutions because they are always looking for breakthroughs and best practices[14].

With that being said, the question still remains: what approach to leadership should a manager take? The role of any manager is two-fold, to take command of his particular department and to contribute the achievement of the company’s goals[15]. As mentioned, shared or participatory leadership has proven to be much more effective than the autocratic, imposing styles. This shift has been in response to the fundamental changes taking place in the nature of the modern workforce[16]. The modern workforce is made up of highly educated and skilled professionals, with each individual having the ability to make unique and meaningful contributions to their respective places of work. In recognition of these contributions, management styles have evolved from that of dictatorial, to one of collaboration and respect for other’s competencies and involvement[17].

Still, the fact remains that the best leadership style is the one that is that is most appropriate to the case, and the best leaders are the ones who know instinctively what style to use in a given situation. Managers must constantly monitor and evaluate the work environment and adapt their style accordingly[18]. Because work environments change constantly, so do leaders must be able to keep up with the change and shift leadership styles as the situation calls for it[19]. Because situations in a business or organization are complex and are always changing, there can not be any one leadership style to fit all[20]. As such, the key to a successful leadership is not be boxed as one particular type of leader. The key is to be always mutable, constantly responsive to the situation through appropriate and viable plans of action.

Collaborative leadership is appropriate in an educational system where the input of teachers contribute to the educational process. However, such may not be the case in a military organization. The urgency of military situations does not give leaders the luxury to consider how other soldiers think of the situation. The less democratic structure of military leadership is necessary because of the conditions within which it operates. Of course most businesses and organizations are not subject to the same urgency of the military, but there are some cases where the firm hand of an autocratic leader is needed. Having said that, the bottom line is that situations vary and leadership styles must adopt accordingly. All of these examples can exist within any organization and leaders must be able to take on such variances in conditions.

The ability to manage conflict and harness it in ways that are productive and dynamic is one of the most important aspects of leadership[21]. For leaders, conflicts are always welcome because they present opportunities for growth and lasting change[22]. Every organization, regardless of its size will always benefit from competent people. But that competence is only as valuable if employees are constantly engaged and committed to the company that they are working for. In a place of creative and dynamic people, conflicts abound because ideas are allowed to flourish. And in a culture of collaboration and shared leadership, competition exists not among people, but a competition within the individual to constantly seek for excellence in ways that help achieve organizational aims. In the end, what matters most for leaders is that they are able to establish genuine relationships and generate positive communication all throughout the organization. Any leadership style will succeed if there is constant communication and connections among all the people involved. This bond is the vital force that will keep an organization flourish in adversity. Leaders after all are not sole hunters; they are leaders because they command the following of a people towards a united stand. However they may be lead, the important thing is that they know why.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bibliography

ARGYRIS, C, On Organizational Learning. Blackwell Publishing, 1999.

BASS, B, R Riggio, Transformational Leadership. Routledge, 2005.

BORDENS, K, I. Horowitz, Social psychology, Inc. NetLibrary, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002.

BRYMAN, Alan. Leadership and Organizations. Routledge, 1986

CHARY, S, A new perspective on leadership. Journal of Academy of Business and Economics, 2004, 10 April 2008, http://www.allbusiness.com/human-resources/employee-development-leadership/300406-1.html

CHENG, Y, School Effectiveness and School-Based Management: A Mechanism for Development, London, Routledge, 1996.

CHOWDHURY, S, Organization 21C: Someday All Organizations Will Lead this Way. FT Press, 2002.

CONNER, D, Leading at the Edge of Chaos: How to Create the Nimble Organization. John Wiley and Sons, 1998.

EVANS, J, A test of transformational and transactional leadership styles on employees’ satisfaction and performance in the UAE banking sector. Journal of Comparative International Management, 2005, retrieved 10 April 2008, http://www.allbusiness.com/human-resources/employee-development-leadership/844740-1.html

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GLANZ, Jeffrey. Finding Your Leadership Style: A Guide for Educators. ASCD, 2002.

GOFFEE, R, R Scase, Corporate Realities: The Dynamics of Large and Small Organisations. Routledge, 1995.

GOLEMAN, D, R Boyatzis, A McKee, Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence. Harvard Business School Press, 2002.

HARRIS, A et al. Effective Leadership for School Improvement, London, Routledge, 2003.

KAKABADSE, A, J Bank, S Vinnicombe, Working in Organisations. Gower Publishing, Ltd. 2004.

LONDON, M, Leadership Development: Paths to Self-insight and Professional Growth. Inc NetLibrary, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002.

MANNING, T, Leadership across cultures: attachment style influences, Journal of Leadership ; Organizational Studies, 2003, retrieved 10 April 2008, http://www.allbusiness.com/human-resources/employee-development-leadership/547202-1.html

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SERGIOVANNI, T. Leadership. London, Routledge, 2001

SHACKLETON, Business Leadership. Cengage Learning EMEA, 1995.

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[1] LONDON, M, Leadership Development: Paths to Self-insight and Professional Growth. Inc NetLibrary, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002.
[2] NOLLENBERGER, K, Combining Leadership ; Management Skills. Government Finance Review, 2006, retrieved 10 April 2008, http://www.allbusiness.com/human-resources/employee-development-leadership/4083909-1.html
[3] GOLEMAN, D, R Boyatzis, A McKee, Primal Leadership: Realizing the Power of Emotional Intelligence. Harvard Business School Press, 2002.
[4] GLANZ, Jeffrey. Finding Your Leadership Style: A Guide for Educators. ASCD, 2002.
[5] ROBBINS, S, The Truth about Managing People– and Nothing But the Truth, FT Press, 2002.
[6] SERGIOVANNI, T. Leadership. London, Routledge, 2001
[7] BASS, B, R Riggio, Transformational Leadership. Routledge, 2005.
[8] ARGYRIS, C, On Organizational Learning. Blackwell Publishing, 1999.
[9] SERGIOVANNI, T. Leadership. London, Routledge, 2001
[10] SHACKLETON, Business Leadership. Cengage Learning EMEA, 1995.
[11] GOFFEE, R, R Scase, Corporate Realities: The Dynamics of Large and Small Organisations. Routledge, 1995.
[12] FULLAN, M. The Moral Imperative of School Leadership, Corwin Press, 2003.
[13] MANNING, T, Leadership across cultures: attachment style influences, Journal of Leadership ; Organizational Studies, 2003, retrieved 10 April 2008, http://www.allbusiness.com/human-resources/employee-development-leadership/547202-1.html
[14] CHENG, Y, School Effectiveness and School-Based Management: A Mechanism for

Development, London, Routledge, 1996.
[15] EVANS, J, A test of transformational and transactional leadership styles on employees’ satisfaction and performance in the UAE banking sector. Journal of Comparative International Management, 2005, retrieved 10 April 2008, http://www.allbusiness.com/human-resources/employee-development-leadership/844740-1.html
[16] CHOWDHURY, S, Organization 21C: Someday All Organizations Will Lead this Way. FT Press, 2002.
[17] CHARY, S, A new perspective on leadership. Journal of Academy of Business and Economics, 2004, 10 April 2008, http://www.allbusiness.com/human-resources/employee-development-leadership/300406-1.html
[18] BORDENS, K, I. Horowitz, Social psychology, Inc. NetLibrary, Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, 2002.
[19] BRYMAN, Alan. Leadership and Organizations. Routledge, 1986
[20] HARRIS, A et al. Effective Leadership for School Improvement, London, Routledge, 2003.
[21] KAKABADSE, A, J Bank, S Vinnicombe, Working in Organisations. Gower Publishing, Ltd. 2004.
[22] CONNER, D, Leading at the Edge of Chaos: How to Create the Nimble Organization. John Wiley and Sons, 1998.